Friday, March 11, 2011

The Second Girl - WIP

I'm late this week for Sneak Peek Friday over at JRU Studio. All morning I was reading and trying to get more information about the enormous earthquake and devastating tsunami in Japan. Living in earthquake country myself, every earthquake hits home with me. Christchurch in New Zealand only a short time ago, and now Honshu. My heart goes out to the people in Japan, my thoughts are with them.

Therefore, I went to my blog only half-hearted and then decided to leave it all together. In the afternoon, my husband's company had an Open House for the families of the employees, there were tours and demonstrations about the products they are developing. Interesting enough, they talked about GPS that have the ability to measure along fault lines that can trigger earthquakes like the San Andreas fault. I wish there was a device that could give us an early enough warning of earthquakes, more than just a few seconds (although, if you get a signal for example through a special tone on your cell phone, 10 seconds would be enough to dug under a desk - an early warning system, by the way, that is already practised in Japan and unique in the world).

Compared to this disaster, my efforts of creating some art appear meaningless and small. I was struggling all day whether I should even blog about it and then decided to do it, against all odds.


This is my second girl I'm creating as a result of the She Art Workshop by Christy Tomlinson that I am currently taking and that gives me so much joy (you can find my first girl here). As you can see, this is a work in progress, the girl is not even glued down. I enjoyed making the background on a 10x10 canvas and getting my hands dirty again. I think what I really like about this work is how my hands are getting into the paint, how messy they get, it's downright dirty and incredible satisfactory. Honestly, I feel like a child who got permission to play in the mud to her heart's desire. I used some stamps (the houses, tree and flower heads) because I'm not good at drawing/painting (which would be the right word?), paper and acrylic paints. Next I'll work on the girl; I wonder how she will turn out in the end. I'm a slow worker, I really enjoy the process.

Actually - I'm really glad I blogged about this. Somehow I feel better now. Thank you for your patience.

20 comments:

Roban Studio said...

I grew up in So. Calif. and experienced many earthquakes. Scary stuff for sure. My prayers go out to the people of Japan. They certainly have had more than their share lately. I agree with you, talking about it helps. Thank you for posting your feelings. God Bless.

Roban Studio said...

P.S. I really like how your new piece it coming along. I may have to try this class! :-)

Marilyn said...

The earthquakes here in NZ and now this shocking one and tsunami in Japan are really heart breaking. So I appreciate how hard it must be to create art pieces but I love this one you are working so. I shall look forward to seeing it when completed.

Doone said...

I do love your second girl, but mostly I need to tell you about my logo + your blog = duh moment.

I only just now after two months of following you and visiting, realised you have capitalised the ART in your name

Duh and double duh...

see I am not a written words or numbers person

unless it is narrative or an image I can't 'see it'

ha ahaha

Dx

Jen said...

In the midst of tragedy, finding beauty is a way of helping us cope. Creating that beauty then extends that hope to others. Beautiful work!

Cindy said...

One of the beautiful things about art is the ability it has to help us process emotions, even tho' the subject of the art may not reflect what is at the surface, the event that is causing the emotion...the art tends to reflect what is deep in our hearts...here I see bright colors and playful patterns - carefully(?) placed. The placement of the sun, the turquoise blue background, the birds, the patterned dress and the placement of the girl...all have meaning, and tell a story of sadness, hope, passion, perhaps despair and a compassion for home and hearth...yes, your artwork is meaningful for the day! Thanks for sharing it!

foxysue said...

This is a very peaceful scene, just right for after the storm, affecting all our hearts!

See your creative drive was just what's needed!

Love to you Sue x

Jennifer @ Studio JRU said...

I can not imagine going through an earthquake. We have tornadoes... they are terrifying! But at least we usually get more warning with them. I am so glad you shared your work. It is looking great so far. Love the houses in the background. I think getting 'paint messy' is the best! :)

John said...

The earth certainly seems to have had its share of narural disasters recently. Great that you have found a passion in art!

Maria Ontiveros said...

I love the ghostly nature of the houses and the patterened paper in the dress. . . these seem reminiscent of Japan to me somehow.
I bumped my previously scheduled post for today to blog about the tsunami. We actually had a "warning" down here. Some folks (who live right near the beach) were awakened at 3:00 am by a knock on the door and told to evacuate!The rest of us got word around 6:30 a.m. It made for quite a peculiar day around here.
Rinda

Kay L. Davies said...

It's coming along beautifully, Carola. Don't rush yourself.
I moved away from the west coast of Canada some years ago, and now that I'm in eastern Alberta I find myself worrying about my family in the Vancouver suburbs.
One relative, who has a 9-year-old and a 7-year-old, actually told me she'd rather die in BC than live in Alberta. I wonder if she has the right to make that decision on behalf of her children.
-- K

Kay, Alberta, Canada
An Unfittie's Guide to Adventurous Travel

debbiesaenz said...

Very Pretty so far! I love the colors you chose. Glad you shared!

Over from StudioJRU

Mekkan said...

Thank you for your heartfelt concern to our safety. Nagoya, the city we live locates westward from Tokyo so we've just dodged the tragedy yet we felt the quake and it was so scary. I was so much worried about many of my friends in Tokyo where transportation was all stopped and many people had to stay in the evacuation sites or walk to home.Cellphones did not play their task when necessary that made me sick! It took hours to find all my friends were OK.
The situation is getting worse by hours. Lots of people in the northern part of Japan had to face the heartbreaking reality. Itis sad. Thank you for your attention to us. and please pray for us.

sonyamacdesigns said...

Wow ... they are both so very ... very different but yet created close to the same time ... I love them both ... but I'm very interested to meet the second girl.

karen said...

Fantastic piece you are working on! I may have to check out the SheArt Workshop! But first I need to finish the two I am currently working on, lol!
I have an award for you on my blog today :)
xoxo Karen

Ginnie said...

The thing is, Carola, these devastations stop us all dead in our tracks...but life goes on! That's the total incongruity of it all.

I'm glad you continued on with your project and blog. I can feel the satisfaction oozing from the page. Congratulations once again.

Silvia(Barnie) said...

Dein Canvas gefällt mir schon sehr gut, ich bin gespannt, wie du ihn weitergestalten wirst.

~Lavender Dreamer~ said...

I love your art...and I'm glad you've shared your feelings. It really does put everything in perspective, doesn't it? But we push on...prayerfully! Hugs! ♥

Randy said...

That's beautiful! Thank you for the birthday wish. I hope you have a nice Tuesday!

Molly said...

I am hoping to learn how to process my own emotions through creativity. Since I have not created much in the past twenty years or so....I am using the time now to experiment with many different outlets: writing, quilting, scrapbooking, photography, and mixed media, in the hopes of finding one or two (or more) with which I can feel comfortable.

I so love this post, Carola, because you walk through your creative process. You have given me permission to get my hands messy (which I have always viewed as a turn-off) and you have shown me that speed in creating a finished piece is not necessarily the sign of talent - or lack thereof. I must learn to enjoy the process.